CDS Enrich

We are pleased to unveil a brand new after-school program, CDS Enrich, this winter for CDS students Grades 6-12!

This is NOT the usual after-school program. It’s all about stimulating intellect to complement our curriculum, delving into topics that pique curiosity and inspire learning and thinking in new ways. Four themes will feature an exciting variety of classes led by teachers:

  • Arts & Literature

  • History & Political Science

  • Business & Math

  • Science & Technology


Three 4-week sessions will be offered:

  • Session ONE: February 6-March 3

  • Session TWO: March 6-April 7

  • Session THREE: April 10-May 5

Click here for class descriptions and to register!


Session 1: February 6-March 3

  • “Adulting” 101, with Mark Wonnacott - US Statistics and Debate Teacher
    Grades 9-12
    Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays
    College and life readiness isn’t all reading, writing, and arithmetic. There are a number of skills students need to thrive in the “real world” that they won’t get in any class. This course covers a range of those life skills. Topics include cooking and nutrition, interpersonal communication, job-hunting documents, and general ‘stuff’ maintainance. Students will leave this course with recipes to avoid the dreaded “freshman 15,” a basic resume and cover letter, and a flowchart to help them deal with emergencies. Completing this course won’t make you an adult overnight, but it will help make the transition easier!
     
  • Banned Books, with Tedd Roseberry - US Upper School Librarian
    Grades 9-12
    Meets Mondays and Wednesdays
    This course explores how the impact of particular books on personal, family, and societal narratives has led to demands for their elimination from many schools. We will read and discuss excerpts illustrating common themes found in books that have been challenged, and we will identify common concerns shared by the people who seek to restrict them. The class culminates with students making a case to save their favorite challenged books from being banned.
     
  • Shakespeare & Disney: A Perfect Match, with Dana Shearer - LS 2nd Grade Teacher
    Grades 6-9
    Meets Tuesdays and Wednesdays
    Course explores the use of themes, word play, and the defining of the modern English language that exemplifies Shakespeare, through three Disney movies.
     
  • Poetry: It’s Not All Flowers, with Cat Evans - US Humanities Teacher
    Grades 6-8
    Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays
    Course explores the various uses of poetry throughout the years from protest to humor, and everything in between. It will also explore various techniques authors use to create images, surprise, and provide the reader with a sensory experience. Students will be able to explore their own creativity and writing styles.
     
  • Western NC Ecology, with Paco Marmolejos - KS Middle School Teacher
    Grades 6-9

    Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays*(subject to change)
    In this class, we will go outside and learn more about the many critters and plants living in this corner of the Southern Appalachian region. We will take short hikes and take time to document and identify what we come across. Students will get a clearer picture of the inhabitants and relationships found here in Western North Carolina, and they will explore a variety of journaling options to share what they have learned.

  • WWII and College Football, with Drew Fowler - British Literature and Journalism Teacher at Owen High School
    Grades 8-11
    Meets Mondays and Wednesdays
    This course will dive deep into primary documents, videos, and essays to explore WWII’s influence on college football, and the positive effects therein that are still felt today. Topics to consider would include: the freshman playing time ruling, football’s ability to provide distraction during a time of destruction, and the GI bill’s influence on athletic programs post-WWII.

  • The Civil Rights Era in Mississippi, with Drew Fowler - British Literature and Journalism Teacher at Owen High School
    Grades 9-12
    Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays
    “To understand the world, one must first understand a place like Mississippi.” William Faulkner, a native Mississippian, understood that from great turmoil can come a greater understanding of humanity and ourselves. Through the discussion, debate, and dissection of literature, documents, and multimedia, students will have a chance to grapple with the Civil Rights Era in Mississippi, the progression of ideals through the decades, and the tension many groups and individuals faced along the way. This course will focus on the themes of conformity, censorship, and civil disobedience.

  • The Art of Storytelling, with Drew Fowler - British Literature and Journalism Teacher at Owen High School
    Grades 6-8
    Meets Mondays and Wednesdays
    Students will learn and identify the rhetorical techniques and skills of the world’s best storytellers, both written and spoken. Through the study, research, and discussion of great storytellers, students will begin to practice and apply storytelling techniques through writings and speeches, both planned and impromptu.

Session 2: March 6-April 7

  • Banned Books, with Tedd Roseberry - US Upper School Librarian

Grades 6-8

Meets Mondays and Wednesdays

This course explores how the impact of particular books on personal, family, and societal narratives has led to demands for their elimination from many schools. We will read and discuss excerpts illustrating common themes found in books that have been challenged, and we will identify common concerns shared by the people who seek to restrict them. The class culminates with students making a case to save their favorite challenged books from being banned.

 

  • Adulting and College 101 with Cat Evans - US Humanities Teacher

Grades 9-12

Meets Tuesdays and Thursday

Course will introduce students to the basics of life after high school including resume creation and building, interview skills, safeguarding their online presence, healthcare choices, and saving for retirement. Course will also instruct students on how to deal with college level courses in terms of lecture, powerpoint, large class sizes, etc.


  • Personal Finance with Mark Wonnacott - US Statistics and Debate Teacher

Grades 9-12

Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays

What’s a budget? How do credit cards work? How do I tell the difference between a 401(k), an IRA, and a bowl of alphabet soup? This course will equip students to answer questions like this. Students will explore the benefits of compound interest, the dangers of unsecured debt, and the challenge of basic tax forms. Along the way, we’ll talk about the gig economy and how students can get involved, how to start saving for retirement today, and the hidden world behind advertisements.


  • Shakespeare & Disney: A Perfect Match, with Dana Shearer - LS 2nd Grade Teacher

Grades 6-9

Meets Tuesdays and Wednesdays

Course explores the use of themes, word play, and the defining of the modern English language that exemplifies Shakespeare, through three Disney movies.


  • Theatre of the Absurd with Ethan Dunn - CDS Parent and Alumni

Grades 9-12

Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays

Students will explore the works of Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus to try to understand the philosophical underpinnings of these literary expressions of modernist angst, and Antonin Artaud for theatrical theory. Texts would include Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot; Eugene Ionesco’s Jack, or the Submission, or perhaps The Rhinoceros; Jean Genet’s The Balcony; Harold Pinter’s The Birthday Party; and maybe Peter Weiss’s Marat/Sade. As some students no doubt are budding playwrights, we would discuss the situationally and theatrically compelling elements of this era, that lend themselves with such ease to writing.


  • Expressionism in America: Beauty in the Chaos with Ethan Dunn 

Grades 9-12

Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays

This is a glossed-over period in Art History survey courses – either because it is too easily categorized and dismissed with a single representative work, such as a Jackson Pollock, or because surveys often run out of time and don’t get that far historically. And yet this is a highly significant moment in the evolution of art, as important, say, as Impressionism in France in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and one that is almost uniquely American. In examining Abstract Expressionism students will discuss the overarching and intertwining evolutions of form and expression through the history of representative and figurative art and then the playful breakdown of form that heralds Modernism, with an increasing emphasis on impression and expression, into the pure and sublime abstractions - yet redolent with expressive impact - of such artists as Mark Rothko, Pollock, Franz Kline, Willem de Kooning, Anne Ryan, and Louise Nevelson.


  • WWII and College Football, with Drew Fowler - British Literature and Journalism Teacher at Owen High School

Grades 8-11

Meets Mondays and Wednesdays

This course will dive deep into primary documents, videos, and essays to explore WWII’s influence on college football, and the positive effects therein that are still felt today. Topics to consider would include: the freshman playing time ruling, football’s ability to provide distraction during a time of destruction, and the GI bill’s influence on athletic programs post-WWII.


  • The Civil Rights Era in Mississippi, with Drew Fowler - British Literature and Journalism Teacher at Owen High School

Grades 9-12

Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays

“To understand the world, one must first understand a place like Mississippi.” William Faulkner, a native Mississippian, understood that from great turmoil can come a greater understanding of humanity and ourselves. Through the discussion, debate, and dissection of literature, documents, and multimedia, students will have a chance to grapple with the Civil Rights Era in Mississippi, the progression of ideals through the decades, and the tension many groups and individuals faced along the way. This course will focus on the themes of conformity, censorship, and civil disobedience.


  • The Art of Storytelling, with Drew Fowler - British Literature and Journalism Teacher at Owen High School

Grades 6-8

Meets Mondays and Wednesdays

Students will learn and identify the rhetorical techniques and skills of the world’s best storytellers, both written and spoken. Through the study, research, and discussion of great storytellers, students will begin to practice and apply storytelling techniques through writings and speeches, both planned and impromptu.

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